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10 Reasons To Visit Jackson Hole In October

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10 Reasons to Visit JH During Our October Off-Season:

Do you want to visit Jackson Hole when it’s at its quietest and most affordable? We get this question a lot! We have the answer since one of those times is coming up.

October is part of the off-season dip for the Hole, the other time being mid-April through mid-May. Here are 10 reasons (among others) to visit Jackson Hole during our October off-season:

1. The weather’s great! While mountain weather is always unpredictable, the snow won’t be kicking into gear yet in the lower elevations. Highs hover in the upper-50s and lows at around 30. The air is crisp, and it’s time to get cozy!

2. You’ll get to see spectacular Fall foliage! Lots of amazing photography to capture!

3. Traffic, what traffic? The only kind of traffic jams you’ll probably encounter is from our natural residents. The legendary migrations get underway with the changing temps and weather patterns, especially along the National Elk Refuge.

4. Access to the parks. You can still access most of the land in Yellowstone and GTNP until later in the month, when road closures begin their regularly-scheduled seasonal shut-downs. You won’t experience much in the way of temporary closures either, since wildfire season is pretty much over by September’s end and snow doesn’t usually start in earnest until November.

5. Vocal natural residents. While you’ll always hear our natural neighbors, there’s a lot of extra chatter among the animal folk during Fall—elk bugling during their rut, migrating geese and other birds honking overhead, bellowing bison as they shift around, etc. It’s quite the symphony.

6. Prices! Yep, $$$ makes a big difference. We know, we get it. Like anywhere, off-season rates are at their lowest with the dip in visitor numbers. For example, lodging options are a bit constricted, like some of the dude ranches and sportsmen’s lodges closing their doors temporarily, but there are still plenty to choose among. Outdoor-focused merchants (think safari, fishing, rafting) are another example who tend to have reduced rates while still mostly open for business.

7. 2-for-1 restaurant deals. To continue the cost advantage with an October visit, many of our restaurants and eateries have gotten to offering 2-for-1 deals to entice you! It’s a beautifully satisfying belt-busting time. You can start here: https://www.seejh.com/businesses/food-drink !

8. Shopping! Besides restaurant discounts, less people means less jostling crowds to deal with, hardly any lines, more focused service (Jackson Hole is very well-known for great service among its many merchants, but more customers naturally means attention spread thinner), and SALES, SALES, SALES!

9. The skies above. If you like star-gazing and admiring the heavenly canopy, then October is one of the best times to be here! While the nights get longer, they tend to be at their clearest also, since October is one of our driest months and Winter’s overcast skies won’t be arriving for awhile.

10. Events. There are still plenty of events going on. Check out our FB page’s Events section and your eyes will pop! We’re an active community year-round, and you can get more of an authentic feel with some of our lower-key goings-on, like film festivals, ski swaps, concerts (like Diamond Rio this year!), Halloween-related activities, and programs even at the Jackson Hole Airport!

Images: @mp_photography1313; @mediumcore; @merejune; @betsystevensonclearcreekjh; all on IG

 

The Scenic Beartooth Highway in the Sky!

 

Image: Yellowstone NPS

The Beartooth Highway, officially named US Route 212, is recognized as a National Scenic Byway! It meanders for almost 70 miles through Montana and Wyoming, starting in Red Lodge, Montana, and stopping at #Yellowstone’s Northeast Entrance.

Arguably the best spot along the route is Beartooth Pass in our great state at nearly 11,000 feet! Due to weather, the Pass is usually open only mid-May through mid-October.

The road opened in 1936, basically following the 1872 route of Civil War General Philip Sheridan and his 120 men after returning from an inspection of Yellowstone National Park and wanting an easier route through the Beartooth Mountains back to Billings. An old hunter named Shuki Greer gave the directions (take a left at the 3rd snow-capped mountain kinda thing?), so thank you Mr. Greer!

Have you traveled on and taken in the beauty of the famous Beartooth Highway?

The Great Yellowstone Arch!

Image: @yellowstonenps on IG

The Roosevelt Arch is located on Route 89 in Gardiner, Montana, at the north entrance of Yellowstone National Park. Its cornerstone was laid in 1903 by President Theodore Roosevelt, hence its name. There is a quote along its upper portion, “For the Benefit and Enjoyment of the People”, the inscription being from the 1872 Organic Act, the legislation from which came Yellowstone Park.

Construction began February 19, 1903, and was completed August 15 of the same year. It cost roughly $10,000 to construct. The archway’s north entrance was the first major entrance into the national park. Folks would take the train to Gardiner and then ride horse-drawn carriages into the park. Several thousand attended its dedication.

There’s a time capsule in it, containing a Bible, a picture of the president, newspapers, and other miscellany.

Have you seen it?!

#RooseveltArch #Yellowstone 

Lizards and Trout and Bear, Oh My!

(Image: Jackson Hole Grand Expeditions)

We’ve shared many, many wildlife pictures from a great many individuals and groups—especially our area’s safari guides, like Jackson Hole EcoTour AdventuresJackson Hole Grand ExpeditionsThe Hole Hiking Experience, Inc.Teton Wild Custom Wildlife ToursGaperGuide Inc., and others. There’s an unending supply for you to indulge your nature loving.

How many different kinds of wildlife reside in Grand Teton National Park? Grand Teton National Park Services provides answers for us. GTNP is part of the Greater #Yellowstone Inventory and Monitoring Network, which provides planning and consistent oversight for maintaining our parks’ health. Besides #GTNP and Yellowstone, this network also includes the John D. Rockefeller, Jr., Memorial Highway and the Bighorn Canyon National Recreation Area.

Mammals. There are 61 different species that climb, swim, run, glide, and fly in the park’s four eco-communities: alpine, forest, sagebrush flats, and wetlands. Moose, elk, deer, pronghorn, bison, grizzly and black bears, wolves, coyotes, mountain lions, squirrels, chipmunks, badgers, mountain goats, bighorn sheep, martens, marmots, weasels, wolverines, rabbits, muskrat, beaver, river otters, and bats, are some of those residents.

Reptiles. While there is wide variety of mammals here, there are only 4 species of reptiles: the wandering garter snake, the valley garter snake, the rubber boa snake, and the northern sagebrush lizard. None of them are venomous. There may be others, and ecologists are on the constant look-out for new sightings.

Birds. With their comings-&-goings, there are many species that reside in and visit the Hole, so it’s tough to lock down a specific figure. But it’s LOTS! From North America’s smallest bird, the calliope hummingbird, to North America’s largest waterfowl, the trumpeter swan, to our nation’s symbol, the bald eagle, there are enough kinds to please any enthusiastic ornithologist. Cranes, owls, grouse, osprey, what’s your pleasure?! Keep in mind the Teton Raptor Center, where you can get an in-depth education of a variety of birds!

Fish. GTNP is world-renowend for its fishing, and tens of thousands of sportsmen journey to the Hole at some point during the year to get some great fishing in. There are plenty of guide and lodging services available here, such as: Fish the Fly Guide ServiceGrand Teton Fly FishingGrand Fishing Adventures, Teton Troutfitters, and Snake River Angler & Scenic Float Trips. There are over a dozen native species in the park’s waters, and as many non-native ones; for example, of the area’s five trout species, only the Yellowstone cutthroat is native. Suckers, whitefish, chubs, sculpin, and dace, round out the other natives.

Amphibians. GTNP has 6 species: spotted frogs, boreal chorus frogs, boreal toads, tiger salamanders, northern leopard frogs (possibly extinct in the area) and bullfrogs. Amphibians may be the best indicators to diagnose an ecosystem’s health, as they’re the most sensitive to environmental changes thanks to their dual water-land life cycles.

Insects. Numbering over 10,000 species, they are the most dominant form of animal life at the Park. Yes, you’ll find the mosquitoes and ants, but you’ll also find plenty of butterflies and bees among the lot.

#GrandTetonNationalPark is a hot-spot for wildlife enthusiasts! Come see for yourself!!!

Rare Opportunity Awaits With Goosewing Ranch!

 

Goosewing Ranch has a terrific announcement to share! A few spots have recently become available!!! Head this way to start your booking: https://www.seejh.com/businesses/hospitality/goosewing-ranch ! Don’t miss out on this aMAZing vacation package opportunity on a premiere dude ranch in the heart of the Yellowstone ecosystem and near Jackson Hole!

Dates now available again:

July 21 – 24
July 31 – August 4
August 4 – 7
August 15 – 18
August 29 – September 1
September 1 – 4

Purple Mountains Majesty!

 

You’ve seen tons and tons of pictures of our beloved Teton Mountains; and if you’ve seen them in person, you’ve been awed and numbed by their beauty and power. What do you say we make formal introductions between them and you so you can know them better?

Their neighborhood stretches approximately 40 miles (64 km), from Idaho’s border to Yellowstone National Park. The Shoshone tribe called them the Teewinots, or “many pinnacles”, and French frontiersmen named them les trois tetons, or “the three nipples”. It’s the new neighborhood on the block, so to speak, because the Teton Range is the Rocky Mountains’ youngest range. The Teton Fault’s eastern block shifted upward to build up the mountains, and its western block fell to create the valley that you know as Jackson Hole. The Teton neighborhood is particularly stunning among the world’s ranges because the drop is so sharp as to lack any foothills or low-lying peaks, thus creating an unobscured, deeply contrasting view between the valley’s floor and mountains’ sides and summits. It is remarkably stunning and needs to be seen in person to truly absorb the incredible scene!

The biggest ones in the family are the five that make up the Cathedral Group: Grand Teton at 13,775 ft.; Mt. Owen at 12,928 ft.; Teewinot at 12,325 ft.; Middle Teton at 12,804 ft.; and South Teton at 12,514 ft. Other well-known peaks include Mt. Moran (12,605 ft.), Mt. Wister (11,490 ft.), and Statis Peak (11,303 ft.)

The Tetons are so visually mesmerizing that Hollywood has been regularly using them as a backdrop and players in a variety of film and show, including John Wayne’s introduction to cinema audiences with his film debut in 1930’s “The Big Trail”.

The Tetons may not live in a crowded area, but they are as well-known throughout the world as are Times Square and the Eiffel Tower!

Have you visited them in person?!

 

 

The Lay of the Jackson Hole Land

Today, we’d like to provide some geographical specifics for our incredible guests to our beautiful area! While most people know our town as Jackson Hole, our town is officially named Jackson. The Hole is actually the valley in which we’re found. So what does the Hole encompass?

To start, the Hole is 13 miles wide by 48 miles long, and it sits at around 6,500 feet up.

Jackson is the only incorporated town. Other towns include Wilson, Teton Village, Moran Junction, Hoback, Moose, and Kelly. Jackson is at the south end, nestled up against Snow King. The world-class Jackson Hole Airport is located around the center. Along the valley’s perimeters are Snow King, Jackson Hole Mountain Resort, and Grand Targhee Resort.

The Hole’s western side is walled by the majestic Teton Range, while its eastern side runs along the impressive Gros Ventre Range. Grand Teton National Park and Jackson Lake take up the northwestern reaches. The National Elk Refuge is also in the valley.

The Snake River courses through the valley’s entirety starting in the north at Yellowstone and running into the Snake River Canyon in the south.

SeeJH has an extensive number of real-time cameras set up throughout the Hole. You can find them here: https://www.seejh.com/webcams .

(Image: Jackson Hole Chamber of Commerce)

Experience Jackson Hole with Amazing Free Smartphone Tours!

Free Jackson Hole Tours – on Your Smartphone!

 

Want to experience the real Jackson Hole?!

 

Toss out your old travel guides and download the free TravelStorys app!  It’s easy to use, full of fascinating info, stories and images, and infinitely entertaining.  Ten of the app’s 120-plus audio tours are based right here in Jackson Hole.  As you walk or drive through the region, the audio triggers automatically, telling you the most interesting stories about your surroundings in real time.

 

How did homesteaders survive Jackson Hole’s harsh climate in the 1800s?

 

Where am I most likely to spot a moose?

 

Who was the “last stagecoach robber” of Yellowstone?

 

What are the dark stripes on some of the Teton mountains?

 

How did the town of Jackson get around the no-alcohol rules during Prohibition?

 

Where are the best places to picnic and hike in Grand Teton National Park?

 

Find the answers to these questions and so much more in the TravelStorys mobile app.  Simply:

  • Go to the App Store or Google Play to download the app for free to your smartphone,

  • Select one of the nearby tours,

  • Attach your earbuds and slip your phone into your pocket (if you’re walking) or connect your phone to your car speakers, and …

  • Enjoy the tour!

 

Be sure to download the app and your chosen tours before heading out for the day.  Tour content is accessible even in the most remote parts of Jackson Hole where cell service and Wi-Fi aren’t available, so long as it’s downloaded to your phone ahead of time.

 

You can even “take a tour” from the comfort of your own home!  All TravelStorys tours can be accessed both on-site and remotely.

 

And coming this May: Jackson Hole tours translated into Mandarin!